PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY

Technology

Piezoelectric crystals generate electricity when mechanical vibrations occur at various frequencies. However torsional (rotational) vibrations produce no electricity as the left and right sides of the crystal are flexed in opposite directions, creating a net zero voltage.

Our technology describes a modified structure, electrically isolating left and right sides of the crystal so that the generated voltages can be summed rather than cancelled - thereby providing the ability to harvest bending and torsional movement which in turn creates 100x more power than similar devices.


Key Points



Always find yourself with low battery?

We are launching a new product in 2017 utilising our technology to harvest day-to-day movement to charge your device!



MARKET OUTLOOK

Piezoelectricity is a fascinating and fast growing sector - essentially creating electricity at no cost, from stress, strain and vibrations.

With a combined predicted market size equating to over $20 billion, piezoelectric devices have a vast range of applications, ranging from nano and micro energy generation in medical instruments, portable devices and within vehicles to power sensors, to larger scale macro energy generation such as the harvesting of pedestrian traffic to power localised sign or street lighting. Piezoelectricity may conceivably allow phones to never run out of charge because they could harvest the energy from movements. Similarly, street lights may be powered through the vibrations caused by pedestrian walking and cars moving.

Piezoelectric devices are not only excellent energy generators, but work extremely well in reverse, working as nano or micro actuators. Traditionally this market has been occupied by magnetic motors, however significant progression has been made in the market and technology - allowing piezoelectric actuators to take over as they offer numerous benefits in terms of size, speed, reliability, vacuum compatibility, resolution, dynamics and no magnetic field. Piezoelectric actuators have been commercialised in IT, robotics, biomedical engineering, industrial manufacturing and energy engineering.




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Invented by